Great Linford

Population: 20,515
Policed by: Thames Valley Police

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The following table and graphs show you crime and ASB breakdowns and trends for Great Linford.

ASBBurglaryRobberyVehicleViolentShopliftingCD&AOther TheftDrugsBike TheftTheft From the PersonWeaponsPublic OrderOtherTotal
Mar 2023631106726514501292151
Apr 20231440146343913131184178
May 202313529752310126122181179
Jun 202321211571601453000120204
Jul 2023923756771685320122202
Aug 20231732558407152104154173
Sep 2023111185818114302364130
Oct 20234119601712120100112130
Nov 20239307497087313082170
Dec 202337183624108312161111
Jan 202439112522555212183129
Feb 2024861841361472022133143


Crime Plus ASB Breakdown for Great Linford


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Crime Type and ASB Charts for Great Linford


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In September 2011, Other Crime was divided into 6 categories - Drugs, Public Disorder & Weapons (which was later split further and so is not displayed here), Criminal Damage & Arson (CD&A), Theft - Shoplifting, Theft-Other and Other.




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From May 2013, the following changes were made to the crime categories:
I) The violent crime category was renamed "violence and sexual offences"
2) A new category for "bicycle theft" was created which previously fell within "other theft"
3) A new category for "theft from the person" was created which previously fell within "other theft"
4) Public disorder and weapons were then split into two new categories; "public order" and "possession of weapons"
5) Both "other firearms offences" and "other knives offences" which were in "other crime" were moved into "possession of weapons".




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The Economic Policy Centre www.economicpolicycentre.com has made every effort in order to ensure that the data for UkCrimeStats is accurate and up to date. However, we are aware of certain deficiencies in this data which are beyond our control. That's because as a 3rd party developer, we do not collect the data, the Police do who then hand it over to another data company to release to 3rd party developers such as ourselves. We only download and analyse it so that you can use it. For full detail of these deficiencies, please read here.

Neighbourhood Team

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Every neighbourhood in Thames Valley has a dedicated Neighbourhood Policing team.

Neighbourhood Policing teams can be contacted via 101, the Thames Valley Police non-emergency number. Always call 999 in an emergency.


Neighbourhood Policing teams…
  • Are led by senior police officers and include police community support officers (PCSOs), often together with volunteer police officers, volunteers and partners.

  • May serve one or several neighbourhoods.

  • Work with local people and partners to identify, tackle and prevent local, low-level crime, anti-social behaviour, and any ongoing concerns.

  • Provide you with a visible, accessible and accountable police service and aim to make your neighbourhood safer.

  • Have been present in every Thames Valley neighbourhood since 1 April 2008.

  • Focus all of their efforts on their dedicated neighbourhoods, building relationships with local people.

Neighbourhood Policing…
  • Needs you to tell us about the issues that concern you in your area.

  • Has transformed policing at a local level, to meet the needs of local communities.

  • Is known as ‘Safer Neighbourhoods’ in Milton Keynes.

Have Your Say logo From the start of 2010, Thames Valley Police extended its neighbourhood consultation by introducing a wider range of publicised opportunities to meet neighbourhood teams.


We will provide open monthly meetings to allow the public to influence our priorities. These meetings will be branded as Have Your Say opportunities, and in many cases will be held in conjunction with partners.



Once local priorities have been identified, a broader ‘toolkit’ of problem-solving tactics is being made available to ensure crime and anti-social behaviour is tackled effectively.


Across the Thames Valley area, there are many successful Neighbourhood Action Groups which will continue to deliver local problem solving, but the introduction of Have Your Say meetings will allow neighbourhood teams to identify more quickly those specific local priorities that need attention.


Thames Valley Police views the introduction of Have Your Say meetings as a positive step in tackling issues that matter most to the public. I welcome your support and engagement in this endeavour.